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ASHRAE Questions
Krisp24
#1 Posted : Tuesday, August 07, 2012 3:52:55 PM(UTC)
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Is there a way to test a kitchen range hood CFM?
Tim Lenahan
#2 Posted : Tuesday, August 14, 2012 9:48:22 AM(UTC)
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I have heard that some people are cutting corrugated boxes the size of the hood area with a cutout for the flow box to make an adapter. When taped in place, the flow can be measured at the cutout. You want to make sure the there is no other leakage within the hood and the adapter is taped all the way around so all of the air flow is through the cutout. The adapter can be reused and you may find that a few of them will work for a majority of range hoods.
Krisp24
#3 Posted : Friday, August 24, 2012 3:19:11 PM(UTC)
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Thanks Tim.

What formula/calculation are people using for ASHRAE?

The calculation that WAPTAC has available to use does not take into consideration for existing fans. I have also heard that BPI has a calculation that may be used for ASHRAE but I have been unable to locate it on their website.
Tim Lenahan
#4 Posted : Monday, August 27, 2012 12:20:08 PM(UTC)
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There are methods for calculating the needed ventilation that takes into account the existing fans and building tightness. I suggest you look for an upcoming training, there are many available, to learn the best approach to determine the need to add additional ventilation. I think the better your understanding, the easier it will be to implement. The Standard is here to stay. I'm not a fan of continuous ventilation, but 20 cfm to 40 cfm is not much air movement and would take over a week to exchange the air in a small house. The challenge seems to be how to get 20 cfm for less than $600.

PS I also tried to find an online resource, but ACI now charges for access to presentations and everyone else seems to be holding back on the information.
LucasR
#5 Posted : Sunday, August 11, 2013 7:24:39 PM(UTC)
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Find one in MS Excel here.

ASHRAE 62.2 Calculator

I've created one in MS Access, that I can share, if you send an email request. The MS Access form is a Blower Door data sheet with the ASHRAE 62.2 calculator, built-in.
Tim Lenahan
#6 Posted : Wednesday, September 04, 2013 8:44:59 AM(UTC)
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ASHRAE 62.2 Resource

There is an online resource to help with 62.2 and other building analysis questions. http://www.residentialenergydynamics.com/ . I found it easy to use.

Tim
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